Dwelling: Five Years’ Work on the Problem of the Habitation

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ISBN: 9781906257255 Category:

Moisei Ginzburg

Description

A facsimile edition of Constructivist architect Moisei Ginzburg’s landmark 1934 book, which focuses on his iconic Narkomfin building in Moscow.

Moisei Ginzburg (1892-1946) was the founder of the Organisation of Contemporary Architects (OSA) group and lead architect behind the first Constructivist building ever built – the Narkomfin building in Moscow (completed in 1932), which is currently being restored by the architect’s grandson, Alexei Ginzburg. As part of this unique project, Ginzburg Design Limited has initiated the publication in English of Moisei Ginzburg’s four seminal works on architecture and the built environment. The third of these, Dwelling, is published by Fontanka in English for the first time, in a facsimile of the original Russian edition. Ginzburg’s first book, Rhythm in Architecture (1923) was quickly followed by Style and Epoch (1924) – the publication that came to be seen as the Constructivists’ manifesto, and which was hugely influential in terms of architectural theory, with parallels to Le Corbusier’s Vers une architecture. Dwelling, published in 1934, was written just two years after the completion of the Narkomfin building and provides a fascinating insight into the architect’s ideas about creating new housing for the socialist city, communal living, and the use of new materials and technologies.

Additional information

Weight 1006 g
Dimensions 21.7 x 29.1 cm
Publisher name Fontanka
Publication date 1 March 2018
Number of pages
Format Hardback
Dimensions 21.7 x 29.1 cm
Weight 1006 g
Moisei Ginzburg was an architect, theorist, teacher, and a leader of the Constructivist group in Soviet avant-garde architecture. In addition to the Narkomfin apartment complex (1928-1930, with Ivan F. Milinis), his most accomplished buildings include the Kazakh Republic Government House in Almaty (1927-1931) and his design (with Solomon A. Lisagor and Gustav Hassenpflug) for the third stage of the Palace of Soviets competition in 1932.