Harry Gruyaert

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ISBN: 9780500544488 Category:

Description

Harry Gruyaert was one of the first European photographers to explore the creative potential of colour in the 1970s and 1980s. Influenced by American photographers as well as by cinema, his work defined new territory for colour photography: an emotive, non-narrative and boldly graphic way of perceiving the world.

In 1972, while living in London, he created the striking series TV Shots by turning the dial on a television set at random and photographing the distorted images he saw there. A later series, Made in Belgium, portrays his ambivalent relationship with his homeland in a palette of saturated tones. Born in Antwerp in 1941, and a member of Magnum Photos since 1982, he has embraced the possibilities of digital photography in his most recent work, feeling that it allows him to take more risks and to capture light in new ways. Harry Gruyaert’s images are autonomous and self-sufficient, often independent of any context or thematic logic. This volume, the first retrospective of his work, is a superb overview of his personal quest for freedom of expression and the liberation of the senses.

Additional information

Weight 1266 g
Dimensions 29.6 x 27.4 cm
Publisher name Thames and Hudson Ltd
Publication date 1 September 2015
Number of pages 144
Format Hardback
Contributors Foreword by François Hébel
Dimensions 29.6 x 27.4 cm
Weight 1266 g

François Hébel is a distinguished photography curator. Director of 'Les Rencontres Arles Photographie' Festival, France, from 2001 to 2014, he is now director of the Foto Industrie Bologna Biennale, and is also overseeing the creation of the new Caribbean Image festival in Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. He was formerly vice president of the Corbis Photo Agency and was also the director of Magnum Photos Paris.

Richard Nonas worked as an anthropologist for 10 years, doing field-work on American Indians in Northern Ontario, Canada, and in Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona. He turned to sculpture in the mid-1960s at age 30.